Lingerie is the most intimate and sexy of apparel. Every modern woman knows that lingerie can make you feel gorgeous inside and out. Women of the past knew it too - with undergarments that were sexy, functional, and always fit with the everyday fashions. From its French beginnings over 300 years ago to the billion dollar industry of our modern world, lingerie has transformed from tight and restrictive to flattering and provocative.


^ Jump up to: a b Petrecca, Laura (January 1, 2007). "Hope for sagging pantyhose sales?". USA Today. Archived from the original on November 2, 2012. Pantyhose can feel like a tourniquet, and once a pair gets a snag, it usually has to be tossed. Going without discomfort costing from a few dollars to more than $40 a pair was a trend many women were happy to embrace.
There is no age when you should start wearing thongs. Most girls start wearing thongs in middle school when their pants/dresses are tight and might show their panty lines. Keep in mind that thongs don't mean that you are a gross person or acting "grown up". Thongs can be worn put of necessity, but don't feel pressured to wear one just because others are.
Up until this time, there was little reason for women outside show business to wear "panty hose", as the longer hemlines allowed for the use of over-the-knee stockings secured with a garter belt. Nonetheless, during the 1960s, improved textile manufacturing processes made pantyhose increasingly more affordable, while man-made textiles such as spandex (or elastane) made them more comfortable and durable. The advent of the fashionable miniskirt, which exposed the legs to well above the knee, made pantyhose a necessity to many women. In 1970, U.S. sales of pantyhose exceeded stockings for the first time, and it has remained so ever since.[8] Pantyhose became a wardrobe staple throughout the 1970s and 1980s.
Thong: Giving you the least amount of coverage, a thong has just a strip of fabric in the back to prevent panty lines from showing through clothes. According to Dr. Dweck, they're totally safe as long as they're not too tight. "The right thong with a cotton crotch and non-chafing 'G-string' that fits well is not a problem for those who prefer them," she advises.
×