Many languages borrow the English word string to refer to this type of underwear, usually without the G. Another common name is tanga (or sometimes string tanga), especially in the German Tanga. A frequent metaphor, especially in Brazil, is dental floss; in Brazil a thong is called fio dental (Portuguese for dental floss); in English, the term "Butt floss" is sometimes used. In Lithuanian it is "siaurikės" ("narrows"), in Italian "perizoma" or "tanga", in Turkish "ipli külot" ("stringed underpants"), and in Bulgarian as "prashka" (прашка), which means a slingshot. In Israel the thong, mostly the G-string, is called Khutini (חוטיני), from the word Khut, which means String. Similarly, in Iran, it is called "Shortbandi" (شورت بندی) in which "short" (from English: Shorts) means "briefs" and "bandi" means "with a string". A Puerto Rican Spanish slang term, used by Reggaeton artists, is gistro. Australians often colloquially refer to the G-string as a g-banger or simply banger.

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Another pair of high-waist briefs that fall closer to the Araks and Baserange spectrum of comfy-but-chic underwear comes to us from Adele Tetangco, co-founder of Garmentory, who says that she’s a fan of Botanica Workshop’s 100 percent organic, made in the USA pieces. “I prefer underwear that I can’t feel on my body. It has to just feel like an extension of my outfit,” she says. “The Astra high-waist briefs feel like you’re going commando. They’re so comfortable.”
Three women we talked to named underwear from newly launched brand The KiT as their current favorite. Created by stylists Jamie Mizrahi and Simone Harouche — who, as the Cut notes, have plenty of experience working with undergarments that fit seamlessly beneath outfits — the brand offers bras, bodysuits, pasties, bandage tape, and eight kinds of underwear that come in neutral shades. Maisonette co-founder Sylvana Ward Durrett is one fan of the brand. “From the seamless briefs to the adhesive thongs, each style is like true magic where I don’t have to worry about underwear lines,” she says. “I also love the high-waisted styles that smooth everything out and often opt for these when I’m wearing a slim-fitting dress or skirt.” On the whole, Durrett says that underwear from The KiT is lightweight and has a barely-there feeling. Morgan Hutchinson, founder of clothing line BURU, says that she’s become a “fast fan” of the brand since its launch as well. She particularly likes The KiT’s seamless thongs. “The high-rise is awesome for mum-tum,” she says. And, as the Cut reports, the fact that the underwear is designed by stylists who have to pay attention to what shows and doesn’t show under a garment is a big plus. Nell Diamond, founder of Hill House Home, agrees, saying she loves that The KiT was created by stylists because it means she worries less about whether her underwear will show under a dress or if her bra is the wrong shape. “The KiT’s styles have really simplified things for me,” Diamond says. “Plus, their lightest shade is pale enough even for a ghost like me (my nickname in middle school was Casper.”)
Thong: Giving you the least amount of coverage, a thong has just a strip of fabric in the back to prevent panty lines from showing through clothes. According to Dr. Dweck, they're totally safe as long as they're not too tight. "The right thong with a cotton crotch and non-chafing 'G-string' that fits well is not a problem for those who prefer them," she advises.

There is no age when you should start wearing thongs. Most girls start wearing thongs in middle school when their pants/dresses are tight and might show their panty lines. Keep in mind that thongs don't mean that you are a gross person or acting "grown up". Thongs can be worn put of necessity, but don't feel pressured to wear one just because others are.
“I love a good high-waist; they bring me back to Christy Turlington days,” says Christina Viviani, cofounder of the Great Eros. Viviani notes that despite its comfort factor, sometimes high-waisted underwear can be unflattering. Marieyat’s thongs are no such thing, though: “The aesthetic is beautiful, and the cuts are really flattering and unconventional,” Viviani says of the brand. “In my store in Williamsburg, we also sell a style called the Canova ’90s Overt cut like a ’90s bikini with an overt, in a fine Italian sporty mesh, that makes a woman look long.”
Laura Schubert, co-founder of pubic-hair-oil company Fur, says ODDOBODY’s underwear is “perfect” — especially the brief. “It’s a classic,” she says. “I love a classic brief because they are comfortable and easy to wear. The stitching and fabric ensures that they don’t bunch or have weird lines.” Schubert also likes that the brand’s pieces are made of 100 percent cotton, and that ODDOBODY “promotes speaking comfortably about bodies, health, and identity.”
The origin of the term G-string is obscure. It may simply stand for 'Gusset' as the G-String is in effect just a gusset on a string. Since the 19th century, the term geestring referred to the string which held the loincloth of American Indians[21] and later referred to the narrow loincloth itself. William Safire in his Ode on a G-String quoted the usage of the word G-string for loincloth by Harper's Magazine 15 years after Beadle's and suggested that the magazine confused the word with the musical term G string (i.e., the string for the G note). Safire also mentions the opinion of linguist Robert Hendrickson that "G" (or "gee") stands for groin, which was a taboo word at the time.[22]
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