It depends on your personal preferences and how active you'll be, but below are the main materials you can choose from when it comes to women's underwear. Most fibers are blended with spandex in the fabric to give them stretch and offer the best fit. It's also typical for underwear styles to have a cotton gusset – i.e. the layer of fabric on the inside – regardless of the main fabric. Dr. Dweck says this is especially important to avoid yeast and bacteria growth.

Cora Harrington (a.k.a. the Lingerie Addict), the author of In Intimate Detail: How to Choose, Wear, and Love Lingerie, says that if you want something you can easily find at your local department store, Natori’s Girl Briefs are her favorite “mainstream” underwear (we heard about Harrington’s more obscure picks, too, which are further down this list). “They’re cute. They’re comfy. The Pima cotton means they’re supersoft,” she explains. “Nordstrom includes them in their annual anniversary sale, and my secret tip is to buy discontinued colorways … after all, no one cares what color your underwear is!” Dolley Frearson, co-founder and creative director of High Fashion Home, is another fan of the Natori Girl Briefs. “For everyday underwear, I need it to feel comfortable and breathable,” she says. “I also need it to appear smooth, and not pinch my skin in any place or ride up.” For Frearson, the Natori briefs check all of those boxes. “They will eventually replace almost all of your underwear in your drawer,” she promises.
A bra can make or break an outfit. While you want a bra that will enhance your look, that doesn't mean that it can't still be cute. The key when shopping for bras is to look for lingerie that requires minimal effort but maximizes the effect. Comfortable black lingerie like a matching black lace panty and bra set, for example, can be worn under your little black dress. Not only is the lingerie cute and comfy, but it also serves double duty by not showing through the black fabric of your dress. It can also be worn under other dark colors without fear it will show through the material.
Change your thong on a daily basis. One of the problems that sometimes occurs with wearing thongs, is that they may spread bacteria faster than regular underwear, which can cause infections. Because the thong is touching both the anus and the vulva, bacteria can travel much easier between the two, especially when your thong shifts in position throughout the day. This isn’t a problem for most women, but if you experience yeast or bacterial infections frequently, you may need to switch thongs more often.[3]
One type of thong is the G-string, the back of which consists only of a (typically elasticized) string.[2] The two terms G-string and thong are often used interchangeably; however, they can refer to distinct pieces of clothing. Thongs come in a variety of styles depending on the thickness, material or type of the rear portion of fabric and are available for both men and women throughout most of the world.
There are many other varieties of fundoshi as the variations on the principle of a loincloth are almost infinite. For example, the mokko-fundoshi (literally "earth-basket loincloth" because it looks like the traditional baskets used in construction) is made like the etchyuu-fundoshi but without a front apron; the cloth is secured to the belt to make a bikini effect. The kuro-neko fundoshi (literally "black cat fundoshi") is like the mokko-fundoshi except that the portion that passes from front to back is tailored to create a thong effect.
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