Pantyhose have been criticized for being flimsy because the thin knit fabric is prone to tearing or laddering (or "running").[9] The wearer can cause a run in the hose by catching a toenail in the fabric when the hose is put on, by catching it on a rough surface like a corner of a desk, or a car, and by numerous other risks. Some women apply clear nail polish or hair spray to their hose to prevent runs from growing.
There is no shortage of underwear options, either. There is a fit for every need and mood. If you require a thong for an unforgiving skirt, boyshorts for lounging around at home or cheeky panties for your jeans, they are all available. Like bras, panties are sold in solid colors. They are also sold with lace, floral patterns and strappy details. Sometimes a plain pair of panties is best. Other times, you may want to be adventurous, cute or sexy. The good news is that there are panties for all occasions.
The origin of the term G-string is obscure. It may simply stand for 'Gusset' as the G-String is in effect just a gusset on a string. Since the 19th century, the term geestring referred to the string which held the loincloth of American Indians[21] and later referred to the narrow loincloth itself. William Safire in his Ode on a G-String quoted the usage of the word G-string for loincloth by Harper's Magazine 15 years after Beadle's and suggested that the magazine confused the word with the musical term G string (i.e., the string for the G note). Safire also mentions the opinion of linguist Robert Hendrickson that "G" (or "gee") stands for groin, which was a taboo word at the time.[22]
According to the Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion, "The G-string, or thong, [is] a panty front with a half- to one-inch strip of fabric at the back that sits between the buttocks",[4] and Knickers: a Brief History says: "Minor tweaks to the cut earned these skimpy panties different titles—from the thong, which has a one-inch strip of fabric down the back, to a G-string, which, as the name equivalent of Spanish suggests (hilo dental), is more like a string of fabric akin between the teeth."[5] Striptease: the Untold History of the Girlie Show says: "The thong [is] an undergarment derived from the stripper's G-string",[6] and according to Americanisms: the Illustrated Book of Words Made in the USA a G-string is "a thong panty consisting of a small triangular piece of fabric supported by two elastic straps. Attributed to strippers circa 1936".[7] The Heinemann English Dictionary defines "thong" as "a pair of underpants or swimming costume in a very skimpy style like a G-string".[8]
As thongs pass between the buttocks and, in women, may be in close contact with the anus and labia, concerns have been raised that they may become damp and act as a conduit for germ transfer, increasing the probability that the wearer may develop urinary tract infections, such as cystitis.[29][30][31] However, research suggests that wearing thong underwear does not have a statistically significant effect on the occurrence of bacterial vaginosis[32] or yeast infection.[33]
Three women we talked to named underwear from newly launched brand The KiT as their current favorite. Created by stylists Jamie Mizrahi and Simone Harouche — who, as the Cut notes, have plenty of experience working with undergarments that fit seamlessly beneath outfits — the brand offers bras, bodysuits, pasties, bandage tape, and eight kinds of underwear that come in neutral shades. Maisonette co-founder Sylvana Ward Durrett is one fan of the brand. “From the seamless briefs to the adhesive thongs, each style is like true magic where I don’t have to worry about underwear lines,” she says. “I also love the high-waisted styles that smooth everything out and often opt for these when I’m wearing a slim-fitting dress or skirt.” On the whole, Durrett says that underwear from The KiT is lightweight and has a barely-there feeling. Morgan Hutchinson, founder of clothing line BURU, says that she’s become a “fast fan” of the brand since its launch as well. She particularly likes The KiT’s seamless thongs. “The high-rise is awesome for mum-tum,” she says. And, as the Cut reports, the fact that the underwear is designed by stylists who have to pay attention to what shows and doesn’t show under a garment is a big plus. Nell Diamond, founder of Hill House Home, agrees, saying she loves that The KiT was created by stylists because it means she worries less about whether her underwear will show under a dress or if her bra is the wrong shape. “The KiT’s styles have really simplified things for me,” Diamond says. “Plus, their lightest shade is pale enough even for a ghost like me (my nickname in middle school was Casper.”)

The origin of the term G-string is obscure. It may simply stand for 'Gusset' as the G-String is in effect just a gusset on a string. Since the 19th century, the term geestring referred to the string which held the loincloth of American Indians[21] and later referred to the narrow loincloth itself. William Safire in his Ode on a G-String quoted the usage of the word G-string for loincloth by Harper's Magazine 15 years after Beadle's and suggested that the magazine confused the word with the musical term G string (i.e., the string for the G note). Safire also mentions the opinion of linguist Robert Hendrickson that "G" (or "gee") stands for groin, which was a taboo word at the time.[22]

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