First discovered these bras years ago, and I wouldn't wear anything else. They are beautifully made, fit me perfectly, launder well and are comfortable. Love the ease of a front close and the wires never dig. I've always had a problem with straps slipping down until I found Strap-Mates. I have them on all of my bras and this handy, inconspicuous little item is truly a life-saver. 

Put your best foot (or leg) forward with SPANX hosiery. Designed by women, for women our hosiery is so much than just pantyhose! We use innovative technology to create seamless wardrobe essentials that add style and comfort. Slim your tummy and firm your rear with control top pantyhose and mix up your outfit with our fashion tights. We’ve got you covered with every style from sheers to capris to knee-highs and more. Get ready to show some leg with SPANX versatile and supportive women’s hosiery. 
Many languages borrow the English word string to refer to this type of underwear, usually without the G. Another common name is tanga (or sometimes string tanga), especially in the German Tanga. A frequent metaphor, especially in Brazil, is dental floss; in Brazil a thong is called fio dental (Portuguese for dental floss); in English, the term "Butt floss" is sometimes used. In Lithuanian it is "siaurikės" ("narrows"), in Italian "perizoma" or "tanga", in Turkish "ipli külot" ("stringed underpants"), and in Bulgarian as "prashka" (прашка), which means a slingshot. In Israel the thong, mostly the G-string, is called Khutini (חוטיני), from the word Khut, which means String. Similarly, in Iran, it is called "Shortbandi" (شورت بندی) in which "short" (from English: Shorts) means "briefs" and "bandi" means "with a string". A Puerto Rican Spanish slang term, used by Reggaeton artists, is gistro. Australians often colloquially refer to the G-string as a g-banger or simply banger.

Lisa Buhler, founder of Lisa Says Gah, told us that she’s a big fan of Swiss lingerie brand Hanro for its “luxe fabrics and classic designs.” (The brand also came up when we talked to some cool and stylish women about their favorite bathrobes.) If the price of the Hanro bikini is a little steep, Buhler suggests Everlane’s underwear, which she says has a similar design to Hanro at a fraction of the price.
Pantyhose generally have a standard construction: the top of the waist is a strong elastic; the part covering the hips and the buttocks (the panty area) is composed of a thicker material than for the legs. The gusset or crotch covering the vulva is a stronger material, sometimes made of porous cotton, but the legs of the pantyhose are made of the thinnest usable fabrics, and it has a consistent construction down to the wearer's toes. These can be reinforced to guard against wear and tear.
Thong: Giving you the least amount of coverage, a thong has just a strip of fabric in the back to prevent panty lines from showing through clothes. According to Dr. Dweck, they're totally safe as long as they're not too tight. "The right thong with a cotton crotch and non-chafing 'G-string' that fits well is not a problem for those who prefer them," she advises.
If you prefer something lacy, Hanky Panky is a classic underwear brand that remains a favorite of several of the women we talked to. When we asked Barbara Corcoran, the founder of Corcoran Group, about her favorite things, Hanky Panky’s Signature Thong made the list. “Everyone seems to wear these,” she says. “They come in every color, like 30 colors, and it’s like a lace crayon box when you open your drawer.” The thing about them, according to Corcoran, is that “they’re inexpensive and last forever.” She says she doesn’t think she’s ever thrown a pair out, and that the stretch material never gives up, despite the fact that they don’t feel like you’re wearing underwear. “I can’t say I’ve worn just these with a skirt (I need pantyhose), but they’re just great and never, never wrinkle,” Corcoran says. And if you want to stock up, Hanky Panky’s three-packs are a good option. Iva Pawling, co-founder of Richer Poorer, prefers the brand’s low-rise style, of which she has many. “I am equal parts proud and embarrassed that I have only been wearing Hanky Panky underwear for, oh, about 14 years,” she says. “I don’t have to think about them, and they just work.” For something with more coverage, costume designer Leesa Evans told us, “Hanky Panky boy shorts are so soft and comfortable, and never show a panty line.”
The origin of the term G-string is obscure. It may simply stand for 'Gusset' as the G-String is in effect just a gusset on a string. Since the 19th century, the term geestring referred to the string which held the loincloth of American Indians[21] and later referred to the narrow loincloth itself. William Safire in his Ode on a G-String quoted the usage of the word G-string for loincloth by Harper's Magazine 15 years after Beadle's and suggested that the magazine confused the word with the musical term G string (i.e., the string for the G note). Safire also mentions the opinion of linguist Robert Hendrickson that "G" (or "gee") stands for groin, which was a taboo word at the time.[22]
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