Cora Harrington (a.k.a. the Lingerie Addict), the author of In Intimate Detail: How to Choose, Wear, and Love Lingerie, says that if you want something you can easily find at your local department store, Natori’s Girl Briefs are her favorite “mainstream” underwear (we heard about Harrington’s more obscure picks, too, which are further down this list). “They’re cute. They’re comfy. The Pima cotton means they’re supersoft,” she explains. “Nordstrom includes them in their annual anniversary sale, and my secret tip is to buy discontinued colorways … after all, no one cares what color your underwear is!” Dolley Frearson, co-founder and creative director of High Fashion Home, is another fan of the Natori Girl Briefs. “For everyday underwear, I need it to feel comfortable and breathable,” she says. “I also need it to appear smooth, and not pinch my skin in any place or ride up.” For Frearson, the Natori briefs check all of those boxes. “They will eventually replace almost all of your underwear in your drawer,” she promises.
Pantyhose have been criticized for being flimsy because the thin knit fabric is prone to tearing or laddering (or "running").[9] The wearer can cause a run in the hose by catching a toenail in the fabric when the hose is put on, by catching it on a rough surface like a corner of a desk, or a car, and by numerous other risks. Some women apply clear nail polish or hair spray to their hose to prevent runs from growing.

Change your thong on a daily basis. One of the problems that sometimes occurs with wearing thongs, is that they may spread bacteria faster than regular underwear, which can cause infections. Because the thong is touching both the anus and the vulva, bacteria can travel much easier between the two, especially when your thong shifts in position throughout the day. This isn’t a problem for most women, but if you experience yeast or bacterial infections frequently, you may need to switch thongs more often.[3]
Change your thong on a daily basis. One of the problems that sometimes occurs with wearing thongs, is that they may spread bacteria faster than regular underwear, which can cause infections. Because the thong is touching both the anus and the vulva, bacteria can travel much easier between the two, especially when your thong shifts in position throughout the day. This isn’t a problem for most women, but if you experience yeast or bacterial infections frequently, you may need to switch thongs more often.[3]
Performance fibers: Synthetics like polyester and nylon are common in activewear because they wick moisture and dry quickly. For the same reason, these fibers are ideal for underwear, especially if you're working out. Lace underwear and microfiber styles are also usually made from synthetics. Just remember to remove them after sweating; according to Dr. Dweck, "it's important to remove wet exercise clothes as soon as able to avoid infection and irritation in intimate areas."
C-string: As narrow as a G-string, but without the supporting "string" around the wearer's hips/panty line, leaving just a sideways C shaped piece between the legs. This is held in place firmly by a flexible internal frame. Since there is no material around the waist, the C-string completely eliminates the panty lines which thongs and other underwear create. C-strings are also designed for use as beachwear, which reduces the tan lines that would have been left by the side straps of even a G or V-String.[citation needed]
Several of the women we spoke to named Commando as a go-to underwear brand, whether it be for briefs, bikinis, or thongs. Stylist Jasmine Caccamo says that the brand’s stretch-cotton bikini briefs are seamless and “create a super-flawless (a.k.a. wedgie-free) fit” whether she’s wearing them under leggings or a silk cami dress. “For me, it’s all about comfort and functionality,” Caccamo says. “Not only do I love Commando-brand underwear for myself, but for my celebrity clients as well … I’m obsessed.” Costume designer and Strategist contributor Alison Freer prefers the brand’s boy shorts, which she says “are both elastic and trim-free — meaning they won’t dig in, bunch up, or cause lumpy, unflattering bulges under a flattering pair of pants.” The underwear never shifts, slides, twists, or reveals itself once you start moving and sweating, according to Freer, and best of all, the wide sides keep it securely in place on your body, preventing a wedgie. “If you’ve ever wondered what the stars on the red carpet were wearing underneath those sheer, unforgiving gowns, the answer is almost certainly a pair of Commandos,” Freer says. If a thong is more your style, two of the women we talked to recommended the brand’s mid- and low-rise options. “Okay, so here’s the thing about these thongs,” says Cupcakes and Cashmere founder Emily Schuman of the mid-rise cut. “There is nothing remotely sexy about them — they’re devoid of lace, have super-thick sides, but they lie completely flat against my skin and don’t show under even the tightest, lightest pieces.” The absence of seams and tags “makes it feel like you’ve gone commando (hence the name),” says Schuman. “Best of both worlds!” Stylist Tiffany Gifford is a Commando thong fan, as well, though she prefers the low-rise over the mid-rise. “My favorite underwear are Commando’s thongs,” Gifford says. “They are seamless, and come in great colors and an array of sizes. The best underwear you forget are even there, and that’s what these do.”
“A good high-waisted moment can make your butt look like it’s starring in its own ’90s Calvin Klein commercial,” according to former Strategist writer and current Self editor Lori Keong, who says this high-rise Everlane pair will do the trick. “These slide right up to your navel, hug but don’t squeeze your midrange, and don’t lose their shape or bunch up around your hips during the day,” she says. “They flatter your waist and hug your curves, but don’t pinch at the waistline like other elastic briefs or ride up.” They pass the VPL test, too. “You’d have to be really squinting to detect any VPL,” Keong says.
In the 1990s, the thong began to gain wider acceptance and popularity in the United States as underwear (and, to a lesser extent, as swimwear), especially with women, but also men. In the US and Europe, the wearing of thongs by men was once mainly limited to the dance belt, the posing pouch for bodybuilders and the realm of male strippers. Men's thongs are now more widely available and commonly worn as day-to-day underwear or swimwear, with major retailers such as Kmart[15] and popular fashion brands such as Calvin Klein selling men's thongs.[16] Thongs are not marketed as strongly to men as they are to women; however, in Europe, thongs have been commonplace for many more years both as underwear and swimwear.
The origin of the term G-string is obscure. It may simply stand for 'Gusset' as the G-String is in effect just a gusset on a string. Since the 19th century, the term geestring referred to the string which held the loincloth of American Indians[21] and later referred to the narrow loincloth itself. William Safire in his Ode on a G-String quoted the usage of the word G-string for loincloth by Harper's Magazine 15 years after Beadle's and suggested that the magazine confused the word with the musical term G string (i.e., the string for the G note). Safire also mentions the opinion of linguist Robert Hendrickson that "G" (or "gee") stands for groin, which was a taboo word at the time.[22]
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