Market research in 2011 placed the number of French women who wear thongs as their preferred underwear style at 25%, down by 5% from 2008.[17][18] By 2016, sales of thongs in the UK were on the decline with Marks & Spencer, a major UK lingerie retailer, reporting that they made up fewer than 10% of knickers sold.[14] Many reasons exist as to why people may choose to wear thong underwear or swimwear, such as prevention of visible panty lines,[19] prevention of underwear "riding up" so one need not pull at one's underwear in public, comfort, fashion consciousness including the feeling of being more adult,[14] and minimization of tan lines.[20]
I’m 5’3” 145lbs and the O/S plus fit OK. It’s big but I hate tight thongs. I’m going to cut the back and just sew it back together to customize the fit. I just didn’t think the other size would fit. Unfortunately there were only 2 choices and I really like the accessibility of this style! I’d only buy again if I can’t find more size options in a similar style.
The thong, like its probable predecessor the loincloth, is believed to be one of the earliest forms of human clothing and is also thought to have been worn mostly or exclusively by men. It is thought the thong was probably originally developed to protect, support, or hide the male genitals. The loincloth is probably the earliest form of clothing used by mankind, having originated in the warmer climates of sub-Saharan Africa where clothing was first worn nearly 75,000 years ago. Many tribal peoples, such as some of the Khoisan people of southern Africa, wore thongs for many centuries. Much like the Japanese fundoshi, these early garments were made with the male genitalia in mind.
Thong: Giving you the least amount of coverage, a thong has just a strip of fabric in the back to prevent panty lines from showing through clothes. According to Dr. Dweck, they're totally safe as long as they're not too tight. "The right thong with a cotton crotch and non-chafing 'G-string' that fits well is not a problem for those who prefer them," she advises.

Hosiery garments are the product of hosiery fabric produced from hosiery yarn. Like the yarn used for making woven fabric, hosiery yarn comes from a separate spinning (yarn making) process, and is used with circular knitting machines to form fabric. One or more hosiery yarn is used to make knitted or hosiery fabric, and garments produced out of this are generally referred to as hosiery garments.

A fundoshi is the traditional Japanese undergarment for adult males, made from a length of cotton. Before World War II, the fundoshi was the main form of underwear for Japanese adult males. However, it fell out of use quickly after the war with the introduction of new underwear to the Japanese market, such as briefs and trunks. Nowadays, the fundoshi is mainly used not as underwear but as festival (matsuri) clothing at Hadaka Matsuri or, sometimes, as swimwear.


The origin of the term G-string is obscure. It may simply stand for 'Gusset' as the G-String is in effect just a gusset on a string. Since the 19th century, the term geestring referred to the string which held the loincloth of American Indians[21] and later referred to the narrow loincloth itself. William Safire in his Ode on a G-String quoted the usage of the word G-string for loincloth by Harper's Magazine 15 years after Beadle's and suggested that the magazine confused the word with the musical term G string (i.e., the string for the G note). Safire also mentions the opinion of linguist Robert Hendrickson that "G" (or "gee") stands for groin, which was a taboo word at the time.[22]
Man Repeller deputy editor Haley Nahman, who conducted her own extensive research about the best cotton underwear, told us that this pair from the Gap is her favorite. “Gap describes this underwear as ‘high cut,’ but I beg to differ: It’s the most classic brief shape I’ve ever encountered,” Nahman says. “I discovered them when I was on a maniacal hunt for the best cotton underwear — an endeavor that pitted these against several more expensive (and lauded) options. In the end, Gap won.” She says these are “comfortable, cute, affordable, and perfectly basic,” not to mention 100 percent cotton. “Asking for more would just be greedy.”

Laura Schubert, co-founder of pubic-hair-oil company Fur, says ODDOBODY’s underwear is “perfect” — especially the brief. “It’s a classic,” she says. “I love a classic brief because they are comfortable and easy to wear. The stitching and fabric ensures that they don’t bunch or have weird lines.” Schubert also likes that the brand’s pieces are made of 100 percent cotton, and that ODDOBODY “promotes speaking comfortably about bodies, health, and identity.”

Model and actress Hari Nef told us that a nude, no-show panty is a must for shoots, where you never know what they’ll put you in. “If it’s a white sheer dress, and you’re in your Hello Kitty underwear, that’s not the look,” she says. Victoria’s Secret No Show “disappear underneath whatever you’re wearing,” according to Nef. “You can wear a body-con dress, and it’s fine. And it’s also not a thong, at least not the way we traditionally think of them. I hate those.”
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