Pamper yourself with women’s sleepwear that will make you want to skip ladies’ night next Friday. Our two piece women’s sleepwear sets, rompers, robes, socks, and single PJs in silk, terry cloth, cotton, waffle knit and more cozy fabrics make it hard to get out of bed. We can’t tell you to hit snooze again, but we can help you give “beauty rest” a whole new meaning with our cute and sexy women’s lingerie and women’s sleepwear.

Hosiery is a class of tight-fitting garments worn on the legs and/or feet. For the most part, hosiery has a knit construction. So, socks, anklets, pantyhose, fishnets, nylons, leggings, tights and stockings all fall under the hosiery category. Available in different colors, textures, opacities, styles and even shapewear control levels, hosiery is a great way to transform an outfit and make a statement as well as give your legs a subtle, polished look.
Shopping for underwear may seem like a necessary evil: it's something you know you have to do, but with so many styles and fabrics to choose from it can feel overwhelming (to say the least). You need to find something that feels comfortable, stays in place, isn't visible under clothes, and won't break the bank. And most importantly, it needs to be hygienic.
In 1953, Allen Gant, Sr., of Glen Raven Knitting Mills developed a commercial equivalent to these hose that he named "Panti-Legs", but these were not brought to the open market until about 1959.[5] During this time, Ernest G. Rice invented his own design for pantyhose similar to those worn today, and in 1956 he submitted a patent titled "Combination Stockings and Panty".[6] This design was adopted by other makers, and this caused disputes in U.S. courts for many years before the patent was upheld some time after Rice's own death.[7]
A dance belt is a type of thong designed to be used in the same manner as an athletic supporter, but for male dancers (especially in ballet).[27] Its purpose is to protect and support the dancer during dance activities without being seen through outer garments, such as tights, leotards, gym leggings or shorts. Thongs tend to offer better support for the male anatomy than do other underwear styles (as well as eliminating contact between the genitals and inner thighs) and is one of the reasons why men and boys may choose to wear them.[28]
According to the Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion, "The G-string, or thong, [is] a panty front with a half- to one-inch strip of fabric at the back that sits between the buttocks",[4] and Knickers: a Brief History says: "Minor tweaks to the cut earned these skimpy panties different titles—from the thong, which has a one-inch strip of fabric down the back, to a G-string, which, as the name equivalent of Spanish suggests (hilo dental), is more like a string of fabric akin between the teeth."[5] Striptease: the Untold History of the Girlie Show says: "The thong [is] an undergarment derived from the stripper's G-string",[6] and according to Americanisms: the Illustrated Book of Words Made in the USA a G-string is "a thong panty consisting of a small triangular piece of fabric supported by two elastic straps. Attributed to strippers circa 1936".[7] The Heinemann English Dictionary defines "thong" as "a pair of underpants or swimming costume in a very skimpy style like a G-string".[8]
Three women we talked to named underwear from newly launched brand The KiT as their current favorite. Created by stylists Jamie Mizrahi and Simone Harouche — who, as the Cut notes, have plenty of experience working with undergarments that fit seamlessly beneath outfits — the brand offers bras, bodysuits, pasties, bandage tape, and eight kinds of underwear that come in neutral shades. Maisonette co-founder Sylvana Ward Durrett is one fan of the brand. “From the seamless briefs to the adhesive thongs, each style is like true magic where I don’t have to worry about underwear lines,” she says. “I also love the high-waisted styles that smooth everything out and often opt for these when I’m wearing a slim-fitting dress or skirt.” On the whole, Durrett says that underwear from The KiT is lightweight and has a barely-there feeling. Morgan Hutchinson, founder of clothing line BURU, says that she’s become a “fast fan” of the brand since its launch as well. She particularly likes The KiT’s seamless thongs. “The high-rise is awesome for mum-tum,” she says. And, as the Cut reports, the fact that the underwear is designed by stylists who have to pay attention to what shows and doesn’t show under a garment is a big plus. Nell Diamond, founder of Hill House Home, agrees, saying she loves that The KiT was created by stylists because it means she worries less about whether her underwear will show under a dress or if her bra is the wrong shape. “The KiT’s styles have really simplified things for me,” Diamond says. “Plus, their lightest shade is pale enough even for a ghost like me (my nickname in middle school was Casper.”)

The history of pantyhose, as for stockings, is tied to that of changes in styles of women's hemlines. Before the 1920s, it was generally expected that women would cover their legs in public, including their ankles; and dress and skirt hemlines were generally to the ground. The main exceptions were in sports and entertainment. In the 1920s, fashionable hemlines for women began to rise, exposing the legs to just below the knees. Stockings also came into vogue to maintain leg coverage, as well as some level of warmth. The most popular stockings were sheer hosiery which were first made of silk or rayon (then known as "artificial silk"), and after 1940 of nylon, which had been invented by DuPont in 1938. During the 1940s and 1950s, stage and film producers would sew stockings to the briefs of their actresses and dancers, as testified to by singer-actress-dancer Ann Miller.[3][4] These garments were seen in popular motion pictures such as Daddy Long Legs.
Lisa Buhler, founder of Lisa Says Gah, told us that she’s a big fan of Swiss lingerie brand Hanro for its “luxe fabrics and classic designs.” (The brand also came up when we talked to some cool and stylish women about their favorite bathrobes.) If the price of the Hanro bikini is a little steep, Buhler suggests Everlane’s underwear, which she says has a similar design to Hanro at a fraction of the price.
The origin of the term G-string is obscure. It may simply stand for 'Gusset' as the G-String is in effect just a gusset on a string. Since the 19th century, the term geestring referred to the string which held the loincloth of American Indians[21] and later referred to the narrow loincloth itself. William Safire in his Ode on a G-String quoted the usage of the word G-string for loincloth by Harper's Magazine 15 years after Beadle's and suggested that the magazine confused the word with the musical term G string (i.e., the string for the G note). Safire also mentions the opinion of linguist Robert Hendrickson that "G" (or "gee") stands for groin, which was a taboo word at the time.[22]
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