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The origin of the term G-string is obscure. It may simply stand for 'Gusset' as the G-String is in effect just a gusset on a string. Since the 19th century, the term geestring referred to the string which held the loincloth of American Indians[21] and later referred to the narrow loincloth itself. William Safire in his Ode on a G-String quoted the usage of the word G-string for loincloth by Harper's Magazine 15 years after Beadle's and suggested that the magazine confused the word with the musical term G string (i.e., the string for the G note). Safire also mentions the opinion of linguist Robert Hendrickson that "G" (or "gee") stands for groin, which was a taboo word at the time.[22]
I'm a guy and I live in Florida. Exposure to the sun has given me some serious leg blemishes...I talked to my Doctor and she suggested that I try wearing Thigh High Stockings to soften the look of the skin blemishes. I bought several pair of Q2 Nude and they look, and feel awesome..I have received several positive comments from ladies who say my legs look rather sexy....they knew I was wearing stockings.
The origin of the term G-string is obscure. It may simply stand for 'Gusset' as the G-String is in effect just a gusset on a string. Since the 19th century, the term geestring referred to the string which held the loincloth of American Indians[21] and later referred to the narrow loincloth itself. William Safire in his Ode on a G-String quoted the usage of the word G-string for loincloth by Harper's Magazine 15 years after Beadle's and suggested that the magazine confused the word with the musical term G string (i.e., the string for the G note). Safire also mentions the opinion of linguist Robert Hendrickson that "G" (or "gee") stands for groin, which was a taboo word at the time.[22] 

Understand what wearing a thong feels like. One of the many concerns by non-thong wearers is - isn’t it uncomfortable? Although the idea of fabric being slid up your butt sounds mostly like a bad wedgie, most thong-wearers agree that the initial discomfort is overcome almost immediately. Thongs are often considered one of the most comfortable styles of panties, especially g-strings, because there is so little fabric to become bunched up, loose, saggy, or uncomfortable in any way.


A dance belt is a type of thong designed to be used in the same manner as an athletic supporter, but for male dancers (especially in ballet).[27] Its purpose is to protect and support the dancer during dance activities without being seen through outer garments, such as tights, leotards, gym leggings or shorts. Thongs tend to offer better support for the male anatomy than do other underwear styles (as well as eliminating contact between the genitals and inner thighs) and is one of the reasons why men and boys may choose to wear them.[28]
The origin of the term G-string is obscure. It may simply stand for 'Gusset' as the G-String is in effect just a gusset on a string. Since the 19th century, the term geestring referred to the string which held the loincloth of American Indians[21] and later referred to the narrow loincloth itself. William Safire in his Ode on a G-String quoted the usage of the word G-string for loincloth by Harper's Magazine 15 years after Beadle's and suggested that the magazine confused the word with the musical term G string (i.e., the string for the G note). Safire also mentions the opinion of linguist Robert Hendrickson that "G" (or "gee") stands for groin, which was a taboo word at the time.[22]
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