Three women we talked to named underwear from newly launched brand The KiT as their current favorite. Created by stylists Jamie Mizrahi and Simone Harouche — who, as the Cut notes, have plenty of experience working with undergarments that fit seamlessly beneath outfits — the brand offers bras, bodysuits, pasties, bandage tape, and eight kinds of underwear that come in neutral shades. Maisonette co-founder Sylvana Ward Durrett is one fan of the brand. “From the seamless briefs to the adhesive thongs, each style is like true magic where I don’t have to worry about underwear lines,” she says. “I also love the high-waisted styles that smooth everything out and often opt for these when I’m wearing a slim-fitting dress or skirt.” On the whole, Durrett says that underwear from The KiT is lightweight and has a barely-there feeling. Morgan Hutchinson, founder of clothing line BURU, says that she’s become a “fast fan” of the brand since its launch as well. She particularly likes The KiT’s seamless thongs. “The high-rise is awesome for mum-tum,” she says. And, as the Cut reports, the fact that the underwear is designed by stylists who have to pay attention to what shows and doesn’t show under a garment is a big plus. Nell Diamond, founder of Hill House Home, agrees, saying she loves that The KiT was created by stylists because it means she worries less about whether her underwear will show under a dress or if her bra is the wrong shape. “The KiT’s styles have really simplified things for me,” Diamond says. “Plus, their lightest shade is pale enough even for a ghost like me (my nickname in middle school was Casper.”)
The origin of the term G-string is obscure. It may simply stand for 'Gusset' as the G-String is in effect just a gusset on a string. Since the 19th century, the term geestring referred to the string which held the loincloth of American Indians[21] and later referred to the narrow loincloth itself. William Safire in his Ode on a G-String quoted the usage of the word G-string for loincloth by Harper's Magazine 15 years after Beadle's and suggested that the magazine confused the word with the musical term G string (i.e., the string for the G note). Safire also mentions the opinion of linguist Robert Hendrickson that "G" (or "gee") stands for groin, which was a taboo word at the time.[22]
Pantyhose have been criticized for being flimsy because the thin knit fabric is prone to tearing or laddering (or "running").[9] The wearer can cause a run in the hose by catching a toenail in the fabric when the hose is put on, by catching it on a rough surface like a corner of a desk, or a car, and by numerous other risks. Some women apply clear nail polish or hair spray to their hose to prevent runs from growing.
In 2002, a female high school vice principal in San Diego, California, physically checked up to 100 female students' underwear as they entered the school for a dance, with or without student permission, causing an uproar among students and some parents and eliciting an investigation by the school into the vice principal's conduct. In her defense, the vice principal said the checks were for student safety and not specifically because of the wearing of thongs.[34][35][36][37][38]
Model and actress Hari Nef told us that a nude, no-show panty is a must for shoots, where you never know what they’ll put you in. “If it’s a white sheer dress, and you’re in your Hello Kitty underwear, that’s not the look,” she says. Victoria’s Secret No Show “disappear underneath whatever you’re wearing,” according to Nef. “You can wear a body-con dress, and it’s fine. And it’s also not a thong, at least not the way we traditionally think of them. I hate those.”
This used to be the case but in the UK, local authorities accept clean, dry textiles along with other recyclables. This is both at recycling centres and curb-side collections. Textiles (including tights, pantyhose and stockings) which cannot be re-worn are recycled and turned into things like roofing felt. There are several internet sites which explain ways of reusing pantyhose (laddered or otherwise). In the US, nylon stockings, tights, and pantyhose can be sent to Recycled Crafts to be used in craft projects like pet toys, rugs, placemats, and table runners.[12] Swedish Stockings, maker of hosiery, has a program to grind down old pantyhose for use in oil and grease traps.[13] In the past, hosiery manufacturer No Nonsense had a recycling program,[14] and so did Matter of Trust [15]
The history of pantyhose, as for stockings, is tied to that of changes in styles of women's hemlines. Before the 1920s, it was generally expected that women would cover their legs in public, including their ankles; and dress and skirt hemlines were generally to the ground. The main exceptions were in sports and entertainment. In the 1920s, fashionable hemlines for women began to rise, exposing the legs to just below the knees. Stockings also came into vogue to maintain leg coverage, as well as some level of warmth. The most popular stockings were sheer hosiery which were first made of silk or rayon (then known as "artificial silk"), and after 1940 of nylon, which had been invented by DuPont in 1938. During the 1940s and 1950s, stage and film producers would sew stockings to the briefs of their actresses and dancers, as testified to by singer-actress-dancer Ann Miller.[3][4] These garments were seen in popular motion pictures such as Daddy Long Legs.
I’m 5’3” 145lbs and the O/S plus fit OK. It’s big but I hate tight thongs. I’m going to cut the back and just sew it back together to customize the fit. I just didn’t think the other size would fit. Unfortunately there were only 2 choices and I really like the accessibility of this style! I’d only buy again if I can’t find more size options in a similar style.
First, the lost star is only due to the thong part no being long/stretchy enough. This did an excellent of smoothing out my tummy and back beneath my bra. I am please with how comfortable it is; but it is still shapewear, so I know I'm wearing it. The silicone was easily adjustable and did a great job of staying in place. If you will be mostly doing one thing - sitting, walking, standing etc - then this is a great smoothing option. However, if you'll be switching positions a lot, then the thong may become uncomfortable. I wore this at work (mostly sitting) and on a Sunday afternoon nature walk (mostly walking) and was perfectly comfortable. Unfortunately, a date night that involved standing at a bar, sitting at dinner, then standing and sitting at a party was not so pleasant because the thong would ride up whenever I moved. It is a good option if you're looking for a midsection smoother without pantylines.
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